Invest in Tomorrow’s Collectible Jewelry Today

Wouldn’t it be great to have a time machine that would allow you to go back and buy today’s collectible jewelry at yesterday’s prices? You can do the next best thing by buying jewelry today that will become sought after in the future. Here are eight tips to help you in your search for tomorrow’s collectible jewelry.

1. Quality and craftsmanship

Quality pieces command quality prices. Cheap jewelry is a dime a dozen at flea markets and resale shops. But quality pieces with crystal stones that still shimmer and faux pearls that have retained their luster paired with metal that hasn’t had its finish rubbed or flaked off, will always hold appeal for collectors.

2. Pieces hallmarked with the designer’s name

A designer’s name or mark on a piece adds instant value. It gives an item the cachet of the entire breadth of the designer’s work. Look for a hallmark on the back of pins or brooches, near the clasp of necklaces and bracelets, or on a separate hanging tag in the same finish as the metal.

3. Name recognition

Not every designer becomes well-known. Every collector of vintage jewelry probably has at least one piece in their collection with an obscure hallmark they can’t identify, and that’s fine if they like the piece. But when they come across a piece with an instantly recognizable name, they don’t hesitate to scoop it up. They know they’ve found something special — and they know they’ll be able to sell it in the future to someone who will appreciate the name as well as the style.

4. Small production per piece

The fewer pieces of an item there are in existence, the higher the demand and price. Opt for the offbeat or unusual — as long as you like it — over a generic piece with mass appeal. While both will have resale value if they’re made well, the unique piece should prove harder to find, thus driving up its resale price. If a more expensive item captures your heart, remember that fewer people buy a higher priced item which can create increased demand in the future.

5. Limited Edition pieces

A Limited Edition eliminates the guesswork of how many pieces were made. Limited Edition pieces should be stamped with both the total number in the Edition and the number of each particular piece. For example, piece number 12 in an addition of 250 will most likely be stamped on back “Ltd. Ed. 12/250”. If you buy a piece that isn’t stamped with the actual edition, but instead has a Certificate of Authenticity with that information, be sure to keep the Certificate with the item to ensure you get the optimum resale price in the future.

6. Thematic pieces

Look for pieces that will have crossover appeal to at least two groups of collectors. For example, Christmas jewelry is sought after by both jewelry collectors and Christmas collectors. If it’s an angel, you’ll add angel collectors to your list of potential buyers as well. The more people you have vying for an item, the higher your selling price will be.

7. Assurance of authenticity

Buy from a reputable retailer. Designers in all fields are plagued by knock-offs. An Authorized Reseller protects your investment by ensuring that you’re getting the genuine articles you’re paying for.

8. Buy what you like

This is the Cardinal Rule for collectors. You’ll never go wrong buying what you like. Today’s joy won’t be diminished if you aren’t able to sell something at a profit tomorrow. And if you truly love something — you probably won’t want to part with it anyway!

Remember these eight tips and you’ll have a much better chance of being happy today — and tomorrow — with your jewelry purchases!

Click here for information on one of today’s most prominent jewelry designers.

Men’s Fashion Advice – Dress For Success

If you want success, you have to dress for it! Most everyone is familiar with the saying, “Don’t judge a book by its cover.” However, hardly anyone seems to follow that advice. People do judge other people by how they look and by what clothing they are wearing.

Quite often, it seems as if the “cover” of the book or our clothing is much more important than the book’s contents. This isn’t fair, of course; however, that’s just the way life is.

The reality is that you are going to be judged based upon what you are wearing.
Your boss, your colleagues, your clients and sometimes even your family and friends – all of these people and more will be looking at what you are wearing and making decisions about you based upon what they see.

Here are some suggestions on how to make sure that your clothing makes a great impression upon everyone who matters:

1. Don’t just buy clothes off the racks at the store – Often, those don’t fit everyone’s body types. Instead, purchase the clothing that fits you best; If you want to go the extra mile here, head to a tailor who can customize the shirts, pants, and jackets to your exact measurements. While you’re at it, have the tailor put cuffs on the pants. This makes the pants hang nicely and keeps them from climbing up your legs as you walk.

2. Wear mostly neutral or dark colors – The main parts of your outfit should be comprised of neutrals or darks; However, you can have a less common accent color as a small part of your outfit. For example: your tie or pocket square (if you wear one) could be an accent color.

3. No “super” flashy patterned ties – Yes, you can wear an accent color on your tie, perhaps with a mild, understated pattern; but, cutesy cartoon ties or loud patterns are not acceptable.

4. Wear dark socks and dark (preferably black) shoes – Brown shoes are acceptable as well with the right outfit, but make sure your socks match it. Your belt should match your shoes – and, yes, always wear a belt…no suspenders, ever.

5. Dress shirts should be white, off-white, or light blue – If you choose any other color, you will find it difficult to find a tie to match; therefore, you will typically wear the same tie every time you wear that shirt. People will notice after awhile, and it will become like a set uniform – you’ll become the Thursday – light-green-shirt-with-the-green-and-brown-tie guy.
Stripes and squares patterns are OK as well, but it should match your outfit and shouldn’t be too dominant.

6. If it’s not “Causal Tuesday” – avoid the Short-sleeved shirts – You don’t want to take off your sports or suit coat and be wearing a short-sleeved shirt. You aren’t going to get too hot in a long sleeved dress shirt – nearly everywhere has air-conditioning these days. However, even if you do get hot, rolled-up sleeves look better than a short-sleeved dress shirt.

7. All of your clothing needs to be neat, clean, and wrinkle-free – You could be wearing a high-end, expensive suit that has been custom-tailored – but, you won’t impress anyone if it has a stain on the pant leg or if the suit jacket looks as if it were slept in. Dry cleaning might be a little expensive sometimes – but it well worth it!

Vintage Jewelry Lovers – Protect Your Collection With These Jewelry Organizers

What does it mean when we call something vintage? The common misconception is that vintage items are also antiques. While this is often true, it is not an absolute. Vintage items can come from any era or period, even last year. In fact, the word simply means a period of origin or a date of manufacture. An antique, on the other hand, must be at least fifty years old. In this article, we will discuss vintage jewelry and how to keep it safe.

Like most collectibles, jewelry often appreciates in price, especially if it is vintage jewelry. The most expensive types of collectible jewelry are also antiques that were created in and are representative of different eras. The most important eras for jewelry design were Georgian, Early Victorian, Art Nouveau, Edwardian, Art Deco, and Retro.

Any serious collector or professional jeweler could tell you which era a piece of vintage jewelry belonged to on first glance. For example, jewelry from the Georgian Era, the earliest era for vintage jewelry, was handmade, which meant the quality of each piece was inconsistent. The designs were often inspired by nature, with lots of birds and leaves, and jewelers frequently used precious stones to decorate them. Pieces from this era are often over two hundred years old. Needless to say, they are expensive and very rare.

As you might expect, women who own rare collections of vintage jewelry can’t just keep them in a drawer. These pieces are often quite fragile and they can be damaged by dust, debris, or simply by jostling them around. That is why many collectors keep their vintage jewelry in a safe or safety deposit box. But for women who like to show their collections off to friends or perhaps even wear a piece or two on a special occasion, the only practical option is a good jewelry organizer.

There are many different types of organizers, from the classic jewelry box to the more commodious jewelry armoire. The type of organizer that you require depends upon the size and the type of jewelry in your collection. The standard organizer has separate compartments for earrings, rings, broaches, bracelets, and hangers for necklaces so that they don’t get tangled up.

If you are collector who only procures certain types of jewelry, like earrings or necklaces, then you might consider a specialty organizer. Folding earring screens, revolving earring organizers, and tiered earring holders can offer more protection and more space for a specialized collection. Most of these organizers can safely hold and display hundreds of pairs of earrings. For collectors who purchases vintage necklaces, necklace hangers or trees are the easiest way to keep your collection organized and safe.

Of course, most collectors do not own specialized collections. Most vintage jewelry aficionados procure all types of pieces from different eras or periods. They may have a fondness for Early Victorian or Art Nouveau or Art Deco jewelry. But whatever the period, they often need organizers that can store many different types of jewelry from earrings to broaches to necklaces.

The most popular organizer for the home is the upright jewelry valet. Like the standard jewelry box, the valet is designed to sit atop a dresser or on a vanity. It is about twice the size of a standard jewelry box and can accommodate small to medium-size collections. On average, the standard upright jewelry valet has four to six drawers for rings, broaches, pendants, and earrings. It may also have hooks on the inside of the swinging doors for necklaces or bracelets. For safety reasons, we recommend an organizer that has a lock and key.

The next step up from the jewelry valet is the jewelry armoire. These organizers are designed for people with own truly impressive collections that they have amassed over many years. The armoire organizer is available in two versions-the wall-mounted organizer and the free-standing jewelry armoire.